Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Nurgle "tutorial"

Lot's of folks have been asking me to make tutorials for working with white primer. Here's a small picture compilation of the past hour or so. Here you can easily see the steps I usually progress with my mini's.



                                     
 White primer. 50% of the work done already...

Some orange and brown ink splashed over the armor. As you can see, I'm not too much into details at the point. 

More color in - some pink and black.

A sepia ink wash over the armor to make the details visible.

White and bleached bone sponged roughly over the armor to bring some damage and highlight.

Tamiya clear yellow over the armor to make the colors pop. Added some shadings to the red and black!


PART 2

Metals in. I used leadbelcher diluted with brown ink.

Shadings. I used al the leftovers I had on my palette at the moment... Black/brown inks for metals. Green/brown for bases. Purple/green for skin.

Highlights. Metals were highlighted with silver, skin got a a white splash. Banner got a jolly little skull on it's surface. Bases were drybrushed with white.

Some layering with bleached bone. Touchups there and there...

Soon to be done. Gave red and brown glazes all over the miniature. Added verdigris.

Phew. Only lenses and some minor details missing. 






8 comments:

  1. I really want to try this - it's incredibly useful to see how you do your stuff. :)

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    1. Go for it! When I was a young 'un I found pictures very useful even I didn't understand the foreign descriptions of painting guides. Thanks for the comment!

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    2. I've not used inks before - what do you use / recommend, and are there any traps or pitfalls to watch out for?

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    3. I usually use old GW inks, Winsor&Newton inks, Liquitex acrylic inks + Daler Rowney FW acrylic inks. I'd recommend trying out the best ones for your personal use. W&N inks are strong in tone and transparent but they tend to bleed trough other paints... It's really annoying - but they're okay to use for last shadings and to be mixed with acrylic paints (for example, if you white paint anything over orange W&N ink you will not have a clear white border over the ink but a mixed up mess). Liquitex + DR inks don't bleed and they're easy to use as normal acrylics. Also those brands have transparent and non-transparent inks which I prefer. Non-transparent acrylic inks are just like thinned down paint but with more tone!

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  2. Very good step by step tutorial, thank you sir! Nice conversions too, by the wa.

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    1. Thanks Juha! I've started a bitz box genocide... I'm trying to get rid of the stuff I've owned too long time!

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  3. Absolutely gorgeous work! Thanks for walking us through your methods.

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    1. Thanks migs! I think this method is kinda all over the place when compared to the 'old style' (black undercoat+layering) but somehow this mess is easier to handle. Cheers!

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